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of fiscal resources and the state of our economy. i'm not a foreign policy guy or a strategic guy, but that seems, obviously, right to me. if you can't aboard the kind of military you need to project power, if you can't afford to fund the state department in the kinds of ways it should be doing, no matter how many people we have or how wealthy some of our citizens are. i don't worry, if you don't mind my digressing slightly, i don't worry about china being a bigger economy than we are. i don't honestly care how big china is. they do have three-and-a-half times more people than we do. i'm more concerned with how big we are -- >> how big or how rich? >> well, i put them in the same -- rich being gdp. how successful are we economically. um, and so i do think it is, i think resolving the fiscal thing is of essential importance to our business community in terms of deciding how much they're going to spend, where they're going to invest, how many people they're going to hire and, therefore, to our position in the world. not just the problem of our debt and deficit, but unless we, unless
happens less than a year later. and the foreign policy effects and the economic effects which we are still living. so we don't really know because history's like this what the real number one foreign policy is going to be. we can guess. we have educated guesses but things happen that we don't anticipate. that's where the arab spring. september 11 and its implicatns. wouljust argue that's why the character of whoever wins this election is so important. foreign policy, as clinical as we want it to be in many ways is a human undertaking. >> rose: this is very important. what do you mean by character. help us understand what character has to do in terms of what are we talking about. character with respect to the presidency. >> i think we saw in 2001 we had a president who had a stubborn streak, who had, was in a way radicalized by events in the autumn of 2001. >> rose: 9/11. >> he was against nation building before he was in favor of it. and because of the effects of that we are living in a world which is radically different. the great example would be world war ii where fdr said i'm a jugul
do to achieve specific ends part of their goal in foreign policy and national security policy. that's what public diplomacy is supposed to do. now, if everybody loved us, it may be easier to achieve those goals, but it's really hard to get everybody to love us. that's a long term project, and generally, a futile project. it's much more important to do as president obama said right in the beginning from the inaugural speech that we need to focus on mutual interest and mutual respect, and there are many things that we can get done in that fashion. i think that discretionary -- diplomacy 230e cueses on specific, strategic goals, and if it failed in any way in the last several decades, it's been that it's not focused on those goals. >> i'm in agreement with jim on this issue. it's note a population contest, but it's absolutely the wrong -- the results are not great results if that's the measurement. one of the things that we tried to do, again, building on the base that jim and his team put in place was to be sure that everything we were doing in public diplomacy actually was designed t
adult cancer. onid cameron's speech foreign policy at the lord mayor's annual banquet. this will be his third time speaking at a banquet since becoming prime minister in 2010. join us for his remarks at 3:30 p.m. eastern. later at georgetown university, musician and activist bono talks about social enterprise and social movements, like his project red campaign. our coverage begins at 6:00 p.m. eastern. >> 2013 should be the year we begin to solve our debt through tax reform and entitlement reform. i am proposing that we avert the fiscal cliff together in a manner that ensures that 2013 is finally the year that our government comes to grips with a major problem -- the major problems that are facing us. >> i am open to compromise, i am open to new ideas, i am committed to solving our fiscal challenge. but i refuse to accept any approach that isn't balanced. i am not going to ask students and seniors and middle-class families to pay down the entire deficit while people like me making over $250,000 are not asked to pay a dime more in taxes. >> the newly elected congress starts work in janua
. the euphoria of re-election is quickly giving way to hard reality of governing with the foreign policy crisis bubbling from iran to syria. plus, lingering questions about the terror attack in benghazi, which will result in those three different house and senate committees, grilling administration officials next thursday. >> hopefully now that we're past the election the administration will do the right thing. coming up to the election they did notch they claim to be the most pope and transparent administration ever but they are not going the basics in sharing with congress this basic information. >> one of the three panels the house foreign affairs committee invited secretary of state hillary clinton to testify about the terror attack for the first time. >> we are very committed to working with the congress throughout the process. >> on the domestic front second term issues are as thorny, with the president pushing for bipartisan deal on immigration reform and that eluded several predecessors. his campaign manager conducted the time conference call of the election season today and did a victo
security challenges and the foreign policy challenges we face, i say that the number one challenge is getting our fiscal house in order. getting a handle on the debt, getting a handle on the deficit which are critical in order to get the economy growing again and people back to work. and i think that is the over -- it's certainly the number one domestic challenge. my point is it's always the number one national security challenge. why? because a healthy economy and a healthy balance sheet undergirds everything we do internationally. it funds our military, it gives strength to our diplomacy, it allows us to be an attractive trading partner which gives us economic influence. it undergirds everything we do overseas. but secondly, it also undergirds the power of the american idea. the american idea is political democracy and free markets makes for a stable situation in the long term but also makes for a prosperous society that is able to deliver on its people. that is really what america has stood for. and by our failure to resolve our own problems and get our economy growing and going
. >> for more on what the president's reelection means for u.s. foreign policy, we are joined in the studio by markets of the swp german institute for international and security affairs here in berlin. are we likely to see a second attempt at a reset of relations with moscow? >> a couple of months ago, the u.s. president indicated through russian counterparts that after the election, he would have more flexibility -- the u.s. president indicated to his russian counterparts. i think there is more room for political initiatives. i think the cooperation will remain limited, given the domestic situation in russia. >> let me ask you -- the obama administration during its first four years shifted emphasis of u.s. policy to the asia-pacific. that reduced the significance of europe's importance. do you think we will see the same? >> absolutely. given the inward looking mode of u.s. society, given the financial constraints of the u.s., there is no alternative. the crucial question is -- will the europeans deliver? can they deliver in terms of financial contributions to international crisis managemen
to be resolved around a more foreign policy guidance. the way it works now, let's change, since my day, is we used to sit down with people from the state department usually the deputy secretary, once or twice here and say what's on your mind, what you think of the important countries we should be concentrating on? i hope that when i was undersecretary there was more conversation, but there's no real guidance. and i think that there needs to be. the second thing there needs to be absolutely is a we organization of the bbg. the bbg has now have agency. there's no ceo eric one of the strangest organizations in all of the federal government. the board itself is the head of agency, and the chair really has no more power than any of the other governors. it's kind of a zion to run the show. and by the way, i'm not sure, as the chair, the new chair -- >> nominated. >> nominate, that's all. this is the way that administration's and congress treat this organization, where more money spent on public diplomacy as far as we know them in any other program. doesn't even have a full complement of governors.
style. often foreign policy, and as you know, fareed, again and again presidents spend more time on foreign policy than they do on domestic policy than they do in the skornld term. >> so when you're reading the election results, clearly the president was re-elect because of minorities, particularly hispanics. do you think that should mean we should not be surprised to see very prominent pointing of hispanics? ? is that one that begins to play immediately? >> i think that what you'll see really an emphasis from this president is on immigration reform. i think you'll see it on the republican side. i think they're ready to deal and come forward with immigration reform. but i think what's important to hispanic voters is whoo can he do on education reform, keep the costs of college down, what can he do to get jobs growing and try to find a way forward, again, in this gridlock city. i think you'll see a big emphasis on that early. and i think he'll be successful because th republicans are ready to deal on it now. >> i think they would put up a grand bargain and come to him first. i thi
here today. i think the interest in foreign policy in the wake of our presidential election is certainly evident by the remotely standing crowd we have here today. we are now already into the process of transition, transition even with the same president, transitions are the most fluid and receptive moments in the are presidential cycle to impact the policy process, and so i'm -- i take it as a good sign there's so much interest in the foreign policy process by your presence here today. now, i think that the transition from a first to a second obama administration may, of course, begin the day after an election, but it doesn't end on inauguration day. this process is going to continue for some time. as the president's new or old team takes shape and where as necessary, seeks con fir nation, goes through reassessment, definition of priorities and opportunities and as other issues, domestic issues, the fiscal cliff, for example, impacts foreign policy, and let's not forget as the world recalibrates to the changes, or as people say, the lack of changes, here in washington. at t
still, president obama, i think, has been cautious with foreign policy, we have a divided government, and we have to take care of the fiscal cliff that's looming, and that's the first order of business. not making any predigses, but i think it's just useful to see where we are, and i think the election results do have implications for some of the concerns that we outlined in the report. i'll turn it over to peter, manuel, and margaret for their summary remarks. >> thank you. great introduction. let me start, and, in fact, i want to focus on the visit at the end of the month which will really be the first major opportunity to see the extent to which the election has had any keep of impact on the way the u.s. is thinking about latin america or the way that latin america thinks about the u.s.. it's an important meeting for both presidents k become somewhat routine now for the president-elect of mexico to come toñ&r the united states bee the inauguration. calderÓn did, and i don't remember back further, but -- >> [inaudible] >> i was too young then. [laughter] in any event, the visit,
the argument on foreign policy in part because a lot of people are sick of the two wars that george w. bush got us into. that's just a fact. gorgeous george w. bush's type of republic party mitt romney as todd akin richard mourdock in another. >> very good with latinos, kevin mccarthy. we have some bright new leaders and we need to have more of those. >> george w. bush's policies spending and two wars ended up also delivering barack obama into the white house. but let's start with you, chip. your take where we are. what do you think of my point that romney ran a defensive campaign but he also did have to deal with the bush baggage, credibility on spending, and a foreign policy that was frankly the by product of the hopeful but ultimately rather confused and unsuccessful policy in the middle east? >> yeah. i think you are spot on. first, let me say i aspire to be one of those old white guys. >> laura: and rich. >> definitely be a rich old white guy no question. that's what i aspire to be. no question a heavy load for romney. to thine ownself be true. we know who we are as a party. center right p
, interestingly, to telescope a long argument, the area of greatest continuity in u.s. foreign policy since the time of nixon has been our dealings with china. where, on the one hand, we think it's better if they grow than if they don't. on the other hand, we have all sorts of problems with them. i think that is the way obama has pursued it and will keep pursuing it. so i think they actually are relieved to have a second term. >> what do they want from us? >> they want essentially a chance to develop. i -- >> you mean develop economically? >> develop economically. and just to sort of breathe. when i lived in japan, i was quite alarmed, and remain so, about sort of the zero-sumness of many of japan's economic ambitions, which sort of came out of american achievement. in china's case, i think it's different. it's a gigantic poor country where most people are still poor. the per capita income is still, like, one-fifth what it is in the united states. a lot of really rich people, but still they have more farmers than we have people. and it's a giant challenge. and so i think what they want is i
room to move on foreign policy, but the next few years will require tough positions. iran and a possible nuclear strike, the rise of china, climate change. >> if i can start with you, the republican party took quite a beating last night. what did the future look like? >> we certainly held on to the house, and the majority is still pretty substantial. >> this is a presidential election the republican party should have won but did not. >> we should have won. the economic circumstances are such we should have been able to win. what it says is the republican party it needs to be less a homogeneous party and more an inclusive party in the future. we have to figure out how to stick to the principles. we want to reach out more broadly than the parties are able to do. >> was this an election not so much about economic policy? it is frankly about demographics of this country. >> i think you have to give him a lot of credit in being able to show people while he did not solve the problems, he toiled in the trenches. i got the impression the american citizens thought obama did an earn
programs aimed at raising federal revenues. >>> pakistan remains one of the biggest foreign policy headaches for re-elected president obama. his second term will oversee the withdrawal of u.s. combat troops from afghanistan, scheduled to be complete by the end of 2014. nhk world's hideki yui outlines the challenges those two countries pose for obama's next term. >> reporter: afghanistan and pakistan are two nations affected by the u.s. fight against terrorism. both expect the obama administration to shift its focus during a second term to rebuilding the economy back home. at the height of the u.s. deployment, about 100,000 american troops were stationed in afghanistan. the number has fallen to less than 70,000, and further reductions are planned. many in afghanistan welcome that trend, but others voice concern that it could throw the unstable country back into civil war. dialogue between the united states and the taliban was suspended earlier this year. during the election campaign, obama distanced himself from the issue to avoid being branded weak on terrorism. with the election b
policy, jobs policy, foreign policy. it is all woven into the same fabric. you cannot talk about any one of those without talking about the rest of them. amerigas to bring a skill set to the next generation. -- america house to bring a skill sets to the next generation. we have to be a competitive generation. the amount of power is probably unprecedented in the world today. that does not mean that america is getting weaker. that should be good news to us. we have to rebuild our infrastructure and so on, but we are capable of doing that. most of the world looks to us to lead with allies in relationships, not dictate, not occupy, but to bring leadership along where we can find common interests. >> let's hope you are right. thank you so much. now to bravery and finally honored prepare. and -- finally honored. she was born into an indian family, but found herself working behind enemy lines tour world war ii. she was eventually captured and killed by the nazis. today, she is honored. here is a remarkable story. >> in a quiet london square where a young indian girl once played, a crowd of seve
. >> what do we expect -- what are you expecting from the new leadership in terms of foreign policy? >> mostly a continuation of policies as we have seen the mayan past. china's major priority to stability in as regional environment but also globally. china needs stability in order to promote economic policies. >> thank you very much for coming in to talk with us. >> you are welcome. >> we will also have a look at the politically sensitive topic of rich and poor in china, a gap that has widened over the past 10 years, coming a little bit later in the program. moving on to syria -- "i am not a puppet, and i will live and die in syria," defiant words from syria's president. >> in an interview with the satellite broadcaster of russia today, assad about offers of safe passage to another country in exchange for leaving power. >> he warned that foreign intervention in syria would have a domino impact around the world. we begin with the latest. >> here is where the first protests of assad took place. this video claims to show the result of a government air strike on the city's great mosque
not understood] former president bush trapped in afghanistan. during last momon's presidential debate on foreign policy, the president of our $16 billion corrupt united states gave aid to domestic enemies panatumimabv to betray people, unconstitutional wars against cia fabricated enemies for fascist gain. obama claimed to be our commander-in-chief, which he is not. he [speaker not understood] end the war in iraq which he has not. he lied about those ho actually killed us on 9/11 t. was not al qaeda. the three capital crimes of trees on rendered constitutionalist turn dictator president obama [speaker not understood]. he can redeem himself. number three, more mass murder mitt transformed himself to more money mitt romnesia. [speaker not understood] imposter commander-in-chief obama committed a treason which is a felony. [speaker not understood] worried about being held accountable to [speaker not understood] by yours truly, [speaker not understood]. [speaker not understood]. president obama has lost his main no-brainer issue [speaker not understood]. >> thank you very much. next speaker. >>> john
have agreed to draft a joint pledge for economic and foreign policies. the move is part of their plan to field a single candidate. the democratic united party candida candidates disclosed the drafts as different venues. >> translator: i will ask them to talk to with the details about the policy as soon as possible. >> translator: we will discuss ways to field a single candidate to realize a change of government. that is what the people want. >> moon and ahne held a phone conference, and agreed to sbree grate their campaign processes and begin talks on how to choose a single candidate. they will explain their views this week. the two nominees plan to unite against park. she's leading the polls ahead of next month's election. >>> south korean lawmakers have decided to spend more on a public relations campaign for a group of disputed islands. south korea controls the islands in the sea of japan. south kor japanese lay claim to the territory they call takeshima. members of a foreign affairs committee decided to tripled budget to about $5.7 million. they say the money will be used to consu
in foreign policy appetite in national security both on the part of the two parties and on the part of the american public. what do i mean when i say that? there is no appetite for another land war in asia or continuing the land war in asia we have in afghanistan and we saw in the concluded presidential campaigns that the candidate who had a wing of the party pushing to take the view we should be in afghanistan longer, that we should do more, something militarily in iran but continually pushed away from that by the more politically minded wing of the party reading internal polling that says there's not much difference on afghanistan between republicans and democrats so you don't have the demand side for the kind of military spending we have seen over the last decade and no longer have public outcry from military spending as a response to terrorism. the second point related to that which is a two edged sword is the public believes that there are cheaper technological solutions to our national security problem and the most obvious exponents of this is drones and other remote wrote --
the financial crisis of four years ago, the chinese have been much more assertive in foreign policy, particularly in these territorial disputes in the south china sea. they have been saying some pretty outrageous things about for example the fact that none of the states in that area can talk to each other how to deal with a rising tide of. they all have to deal with china bilaterally. >> a party theorist ones that the real threat to china lies in the american encouragement of rights lawyers, underground religious activists, dissidents, a vulnerable groups. when this list was published, there was outrage because of the overtones with mao era which ones. there is no problem of democratic accountability at all. >> china will evolve its own type of democracy, whether at the west except it or not. i'd describe it this as some kind of election of a the past 2000, 200 years since china was traded to. at the top level, it is always a unified confusion. we havwithout this type of structure, the country will disintegrate. what is the greatest fear in your life, it would be chaos. >> right on
are well versed in the history of china's foreign policy. the is not a simple bureaucratic politician. there is a degree of relaxation, candor, and to the extent humor in his exchanges. >> he is not going to be a dominant leader. he is going to have to create a consensus in the leading body. that is not going to be easy to do. there is enormous opposition to reform, both political and economic. >> xi jinping -- i think more and more numbered generation educated in free countries, they already got some sort of experience, the value of free world. judging that way, i feel there is a possibility, a real chance to change for political reform. >> with me, tim wilcox. our headlines. xi jinping has become china's new leader. he smiled and waved after being selected as the new leader. three hamas leaders died in airstrikes. hundreds of supporters have turned out on the streets of gaza for the funeral of a militant leader who was killed in an air strike on wednesday. 10 other people died and that attacked. in the past few hours, israeli authorities say three people were killed from a rocket fi
the second-term challenges and then foreign policy including the situation in syria and iran and the latest fallout from benghazi ed henry is live at the white house. a lot of challenges from abroad. >>reporter: you talk about the fiscal cliff, they have that and after what has been happening with syria and that is play out with violence on the ground. assad will not give in. the euphoria from tuesday night, you talk to people inside the white house, they knew that is evaporating and we have to get down to business so today the president got a stream of calls from world leaders, including from the u.k., and david cameron, and binyamin netanyahu from israel, as well, congratulations, but, also, in doubt the phone calls, a lot of business being conducted with the president realizing particularly in the middle east there is a lot of major problems to confront. i am told by senior officials before election day the chief of staff, jack lou and others have been meeting and planning and if the president were re-elected they would have to hit the ground running on domestic issues and foreign policy
.i.a. then former senator evan bayh on the fiscal cliff. then senior editor of foreign policy magazine will be on. ♪ host: good morning, welcome to "washington journal." the fbi investigation that led to the resignation of general david petraeus has expanded to general john allen. the impact of all this on the intelligence community and national security will be part of several hearings on capitol hill later this week. lawmakers return to washington today amid a shake-up of the president obama national security team, facing the looming issue of the so-called fiscal cliff. that is where we want to begin today this morning. president obama will meet later on with labor leaders who are insisting that the president not compromise on cuts to medicare and social security. what is your take on this? avoiding this -- avoiding the fiscal cliff? host: remember, you can send us a clear message, post your comments on facebook, or send us an e-mail, journal@c-span.org. courtesy of the newseum, washington, front page of that newspaper and many of the newspapers this morning, including "the washington post,"
: i just wanted to say the foreign policy of obama is a spitting image of bush. we have droned more pakistan as than bush under obama. it is only creating more terrorists. we see what is going on with the arab spring . they are electing these islamists. there is a blow back. host: let's take a look at a story on some overseas news. it says -- and other international story -- you can see this image coming to us from "the new york times." more news on the political and domestic front. president obama pressed for higher taxes but he adds caveats. is it president obama met with business leaders. the headline from "the washington journal -- the wall street journal." looking at the republican side of the fiscal house, republicans say the plan must be bolder. house republicans say paul ryan will continue to be a major player after his failed bid as mitt romney's running mate. the budget he pushed through no longer does enough to clean up the nation's fiscal miss. in the race for congressman alan west's house seat -- one more political story -- former presidential candidate obama wins presi
sadloff and delighted to see you here today. i think the interest in foreign policy in the wake of our presidential election is certainly evidence by the standing remotely crowd we have here today. we are now already into the process of transition, a transition even with the same president, transitions are the most flute and receptive moments in the presidential cycle to have an impact on the policy process, and so i'm -- i take it as a good sign there's so much interest in the foreign policy process by your presence here today. now, i think the transition from a first to a second obama administration may, of course, begin the day after an election, but it doesn't end on inauguration day. this process is going to continue for sometime. as the president's new or old team takes shape, and where necessary, seeks confirmation, as the new old team goes through the inevidentble period of reassessment and redefinition of priorities and opportunities and as other issues, domestic issues, the fiscal cliff, for example, impacts foreign policy, and not forget as the world recalibrates changes or
. host: benjamin pauker is senior editor of "foreign policy magazine." we'll get to your calls in a minute. could there be foreign policy fallout in the benghazi attacks on libya? guest: i think there's a lot we don't know. this is one of those scandals that comes out in dribs and drabs. drip, leak, leak, leak. i think there is a sort of consensus that we want to know more. the american public wants to know more. certainly journalists do. there could be political fallout from it. this is a week where there's going to be a number of hearings on ben gaza. so both the house and senator intelligence committees were meeting. there is certainly, congressionally, the desire to hear more and hear more facts. there are big questions that are unanswered. both in the time frame of what happened in the attack, little bits of information, but also in terms of whether the u.s. was ill prepared or naive in terms of providing security for ambassador chris stevens. any tragedy where an ambassador dies and three other americans, there needs to be an investigation. host: will in tennessee, indepe
control. president obama, i think, has been shown to be pretty cautious when it comes to foreign policy. we still have a divided government and we also have to take care of this fiscal cliff that is looming, and that is the first order of business. not making any predictions, but i think it is just useful to see where we are and i do think the election results to have implications for some of the concerns that we outlined in this report. i will turn it over to peter and then market and manuel. >> thank you. a good introduction. let me start -- i want to focus on the opinion yet to visit at the end of this month, which will really be the first major opportunity to see the extent to which the election really has had any kind of impact on the way the u.s. is thinking about latin america or the way that latin america is thinking about the u.s.. this is an important meeting for both presidents. it has become somewhat routine now with the president elect of mexico to come to the u.s. before the inauguration. calderÓn did, foxx did. i do not remember back farther than that, but anyhow -- i wa
not mind seing the united states gone. it's important when formulating foreign policy that the united states, particularly the obama administration, decide, are we going to be assisted with our own personal security issue here in the united states by the actions we take or are the re-- reactions that are going to be caused by our actions actually going to cause greater threats to our closest allies and to ourselves? unfortunately, that's what we're seeing. in fact, i had seen an article in may of 2010 that indicated that this administration, the obama administration, sided with israel's enemies in demanding that israel disclose any nuclear weapons. we had never sided with israel's enemies in trying to push israel into doing something against its own interests. when you're a very small country surrounded by countries that want to see you go away, it is important that they not know all of your defenses. going back in the old testament, you find history, king his kaija -- king hezekiah showing all the defenses they had in their armory he showed them to the leaders from babylon. as a resu
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 112 (some duplicates have been removed)